Knee

Arthroscopy of the knee joint


An arthroscope is a fibre optic telescope that can be inserted through a very small surgical incision (keyhole surgery).A camera attached to the arthroscope allows a picture to be visualized on a TV monitor. Through a separate small incision, surgical instruments can be inserted to manage a number of conditions.

The most common indication for a knee arthroscopy is a torn cartilage(meniscus). In this setting the cartilage is trimmed to give a stable rim. Other indications for knee arthroscopy include removal of loose bodies.

This surgery is done as a day only procedure where the patient is generally allowed to weight bear immediately following surgery.

For more information :   AAOS, Ortho Info:
Arthroscopy  
    Arthritis of the knee  
   
Arthritis Australia: 

Information Sheets
 
               Download post operative instructions here:

Knee replacement


A total knee replacement involves replacing the arthritic knee joint with an artificial joint made out of metal and plastic. This is a very common procedure and is most commonly done for osteoarthritis (wear and tear).Other indications include inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or for avascular necrosis.

The surgery is indicated if non operative measures such as simple analgesics, anti-inflammatories and weight loss have failed.
The aim of the surgery is to relieve pain and allow patients to return to their normal activities of daily living.

The average age of knee replacement in Australia is 70 years although the surgery is occasionally done in younger patients particularly for conditions such as haemophillia.

The decision to proceed with surgery is made by the patient in conjunction with family, the general practitioner and Dr Horsley.


For more information :   AAOS, Ortho Info:
Knee replacement 
    Arthritis of the knee
   
Arthritis Australia: 
 
Information sheets